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How to master the art of Maximalist Interior Design with pattern clashing.


Pattern clashing is a design staple when it comes to maximalist interior design. The term pattern clashing means using various different patterns within one design scheme within your space. It can be tricky to get right and can be quite daunting but done correctly it is a fabulous way to have fun with your interiors and show off your personality.


Here are my 5 top tips for how to successfully pattern clash in your home.




  • Stage 1

For pattern clashing to really work you need to go for bold statement patterns not neutrals. Pick one pattern that is your favourite and that you want to use as your base pattern.



  • Stage 2

Next you want to look at your base pattern and pick out its key colours. There are a few ways you can do this. Firstly, you can look at the pattern and pick out 1 or 2 colours that really resonate with you. Secondly, you can look at the overall colour category of the pattern. This is slightly trickery to do if you are new to pattern clashing but does give you more variation in playing with the colours. By colour category I am referring to the following:





  • Stage 3

This stage is about picking your additional patterns. You want to pick 1 or 2 other patterns to incorporate into your design. Try not to exceed 3 patterns in one space. For this stage the pattern choices are endless. You can use:

Florals

Geometric shapes

Animals or animal print

Stripes

Dots/spots

Abstract shapes


Whatever you like and whatever fits your personality.


Stage 3 is the key to pattern clashing. You want to take the colour or colour category you identified in stage 2 and use this to pick your new patterns. You are looking for the colour similarities within the patterns. This will be the key to holding everything together.

Pattern clashing example with lack velvet fabric with beetle design paired with ginger thin striped fabric and green star ceramic tile.
Base pattern plus 2 additional new patterns- all within the Jewel Tones colour category. Stripe fabric- Ginger by Love your Home. Tile- Cinders by Walls and Floors


  • Stage 4

Now it's time to play with texture. You can add pattern into your scheme in so many different ways. It could be through wallpaper, carpets, rugs, cushions, headboards, furniture or accessories- like vases, pots, photo frames and artwork. Using a variety of ‘vehicles’ for your pattern will add points of interest around the room and will allow the room to work as a collective space (rather than just one area within the scheme with lots of patterns). This approach also allows you to play with impact, you could have a large amount of pattern coming in through a wallpaper design with small areas of pattern in the accessories e.g. rugs, lampshades and artwork. Alternatively, you could have various elements across the room e.g. rugs, curtains and cushions that all carry an equal level of impact in the space.



Pattern clashing example with lack velvet fabric with beetle design paired with ginger thin striped fabric and green star ceramic tile.  Green vase with striped detail and speckle. Cabinet handle with gold trim and bug motif.
Pattern clashing with pattern added through accessories

  • Stage 5

This stage is all about incorporating your patterns into your space, or your concept board if you are still in the planning phases. At this stage is it very important to introduce moments of ‘quiet’ into the design and these can be through block colour. Doing this will allow the space to breathe and for your eye to travel around the space to moments of quiet and not feel too overwhelmed. Examples of this could be plain fabric, painted walls, plain furniture items.



Pattern clashing example with lack velvet fabric with beetle design paired with ginger thin striped fabric and green star ceramic tile.  Green vase with striped detail and speckle. Cabinet handle with gold trim and bug motif.  Black and orange paint colours. Mustard orange fabric and gold mirror
Final pattern clashing design


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